OG and iPad at The International Dyslexia Association

The International Dyslexia Association’s Annual Conference is committed to growing awareness, research, and education in the areas of literacy instruction and interventions for all levels. This annual conference is a four-day event bringing in over 2,000 attendees globally. Educators, therapists, reading specialists, physicians, researchers, and parents of children with dyslexia and other language disorders come to engage with keynote speakers in a wide variety of work sessions and poster presentations on the most current research. Some of the topics represented are Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Response to Intervention, Literacy, Critical Reading, Vocabulary, Spelling, Morphology, Language Disorders, and Advocacy. IDA’s Annual Conference also offers an exhibit hall which allows the opportunity to browse curriculum, software, materials, and of course, the opportunity to network with other professionals.ida

The 2016 IDA Annual Conference was held in Orlando, Florida in late October. With keynote speakers like Albert Galaburda and Guinevere Eden, my colleague, January Reed and I, were thrilled to be attending this year. Not only were the keynote presentations conveying the most current research about literacy and the brain, but other sessions were led by well-respected presenters such as Ron Yoshimoto and William Van Cleave. We were able to attend a variety of sessions, including Orthographic Processing, Neuroscience of Dyslexia, Morphology, Executive Functioning, allowing us to learn new strategies, look at students from fresh perspectives, and engage in collaborative discussions with other professionals at the conference.

January and I were honored to present at the 2016 IDA. Our presentation, entitled Using iPads to Enhance Multi-Sensory Instruction, focused on empowering educators to create innovative lessons to remediate struggling readers, improve spelling, and increase attention using the iPad. We offered practical examples to enhance literacy instruction while keeping students engaged and accountable for their learning.

Being able to attend this conference was valuable to our growth as educators in several different ways. We were able to attend sessions with specific intentions to gain expertise to serve our students with the most effective interventions. We networked with other professionals who share our passion to remediate and advocate for children and adults affected by dyslexia. We engaged in deep reflection looking closely at effectively adapting strategies for the future. Lastly, we returned to our school encouraged and inspired to teach and continue our work with struggling readers.