Students-Created Instructional Videos with Do Ink

“While we teach, we learn,” said the Roman philosopher Seneca.  Mr. Elliott’s 7th grade science classes recently put this ancient wisdom into action by creating amazing instructional videos detailing their knowledge of the circulatory system.

Part of a larger study of the human body, 7th graders covered the circulatory system content using their Discovery Ed Science Techbooks, with the guidance of a teacher-provided outline and other select resources.  In past years, Mr. Elliott would have then assigned students a final culminating project, such as an oral report, or slide presentation.  But this year, he wanted his students to utilize audio/visual-rich technology tools to demonstrate their expert status on specific elements of the circulatory system.  So Mr. Elliott charged his 7th graders with the task of creating interesting and unique, narrated instructional videos.

Working in pairs, the 7th graders began by reviewing a selection of copyright-friendly, editable Discovery Ed videos.  Each student group was asked to present a specific areas of the circulatory system, such as the heart, blood vessels, or blood cell types.  Once the students had selected some interesting video, they transferred clips into iMovie to do some initial editing.  Each group then wrote a detailed script to accompany their video.  Excitement and anticipation about the project grew as students prepared for their Green Screen Studio appointment slots by practicing script narration timing with their custom videos.  Mr. Elliott observed that enthusiasm for this project drove students to be quite independent while completing their work.

IMG_0459Once everything was prepared, each student group arrived at Fletcher’s Green Screen Studio and began downloading their scripts into the PromptSmart teleprompter app.  They next set up their edited iMovie in the Green Screen by Do Ink app, which enabled the student experts to see their video playing behind them while they read their script. Classmates volunteered to run the iPad camera and teleprompter, creating a positive, collaborative atmosphere.  The experts donned their lab coats and enjoyed filming their creations, resulting in exceptional videos.

Poetry Podcast

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.11.27 PMBy Kathy Poe and Shannon Nichols

Mrs. Nichols’ classes developed a poem based on a famous person that has made a difference. She had her students create a poster of their poem with photos. Mrs. Poe extended the project by having the students make a podcast of the poems.

This Written Expression project was twofold. First the students studied the style of Narrative Poetry. We listened to, read, and dissected three infamous narrative poems: Casey at Bat, Harriet Tubman, and Caged Bird. After closely reading each poem, students determined that narrative poetry tells a story, uses repetition as a tool, and often contains symbolism. In the spirit of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, the students identified and researched a person that has been a champion of human rights. They applied the knowledge learned about their chosen role model to create a narrative poem for the second piece of this assignment. The poem was presented as a poster with illustrations.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.19.53 PMWith the poem written our students turned their poetry into a Podcast. They watched videos of champion poetry readers from Poetry Out Loud to see how other students deliver a poem in a dramatic way. To make them come alive our students practiced recording their poems working on diction, fluency, timing and presentation. They used GarageBand to record their poems and added music that fit the time period. Recording their poems brought them to life beyond the bulletin board. Finally, we created a QR code to listen to each one.

Click here or use the QR code to listen to all our Poetry Podcasts!

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.18.20 PM

Hour of Code at Fletcher

IMG_0247This is our third year to participate in Hour of Code, an International focus during the week of December 7th to highlight the possibilities that learning to code can offer to students in our technological age.

This week Paula Paul came and spoke to us about her career as a programmer and introduced us to what real coding looks like through koding.com.

Mrs. Poe’s 7th grade computer classes will spend not just an hour but more than a week working with a coding simulation interface to experience how to talk to a computer and what it takes for a computer to interact with them.

There are many options available to learn to code such as Code.org, Code Academy and Khan Academy and we match the students to a site that fits their interests and abilities. These sites are available to anyone, anytime so check them out and try coding yourself!

 

Khan Academy

Khan Academy is a good coding web site. On Khan Academy you can learn and write code. I have learned a lot about Khan. My favorite part about Khan is that you can make your own invention. My teacher tells me that if I like coding I should stick with it and maybe some day I could make my own web page or something bigger. On Khan you can listen and watch videos that help you learn to code. I made a program where a snowman is reaching for his hat and its snowing. Making a program on Khan takes time. When you get mad because something doesn’t work you can always go back and watch the video for help. Once you finish making your program you can save and spin it off.  When you spin it off every one who is on Khan can see it. Khan Academy is a great web site for coding.

Modeling Programs With Cell Models or Student Cellfies!

Every year Mr. Elliott has his students create a model of a cell. This year I had our students take photographs of their cell models with either cell phones, iPads or cameras. We used the photos to create digital projects supporting the lessons about cells and organelles that they had learned in Science class.

Hannah used the picstitch app on her phone to build a collage of cells.

We learned to extract the cell image to make our cell into clipart using Pixlar Editor, a Google App.

With the extracted images we collaborated on a presentation in Google Docs where each student worked on their own slide in the same powerpoint.    1st Period Cell Project

And finally we imported the powerpoint into Prezi to experience another tool and how to use it.

Cell Model Prezi

We will continue to use content from other classes to explore programs and applications such as Glogster, Scratch, Kidblog and more!

Kathy Poe